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Biodiesel proponents question Commerce Department decision

3 orgs ask Trump for 'comprehensive' review of U.S. trade duties on Argentine biodiesel companies.

The National Biodiesel Board, the American Soybean Association and the National Renderers Association are urging President Trump to ensure the Department of Commerce undertakes a rigorous, comprehensive and transparent review of U.S. trade duties on Argentine biodiesel companies before considering any adjustment to the duty rates it established just this year.

Related: Trump administration reviewing duties on Argentine biodiesel

The U.S. Commerce Department imposed antidumping and countervailing duty orders in January and April 2018, following investigations in which the government found that biodiesel imports from Argentina were massively subsidized and dumped, injuring U.S. biodiesel producers.

“Given the importance of this new remedy for American energy and agriculture against unfair imports, it is a mystery that Commerce would open an expedited path for Argentina to reduce or remove the tariffs and resume their illegal imports. This political concession to the government of Argentina would once again distort U.S. markets and undercut crop prices that are only now regaining stability, following other trade disruptions,” the groups, which represent stakeholders in U.S. biodiesel production, state in a letter to Trump

The groups opposed Commerce’s initiation of the changed circumstances review, arguing that Commerce has well-established administrative review procedures for revisiting antidumping and countervailing duty rates. The agency has not used “changed circumstances” reviews for these purposes. Commerce’s initiation of these reviews just months after finding that Argentina engaged in unfair trade practices creates a great deal of uncertainty for the biodiesel industry and other stakeholders. 

Source: National Biodiesel Board

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